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Maintenance Treatments for Methadone in Rehab

Methadone is a prescription narcotic that is most often utilized for pain relief. Much like other prescription drugs, methadone is strongly addictive, and lethal when abused. Per some 2004 data from the APCC (Association for Poison Control Centers), over 4,000 phone calls regarding methadone were placed to poison control centers.

Additionally, methadone and other types of painkillers are very easily addictive. If you or somebody you love may have an issue with addiction or abuse of methadone, contact Detox of South Florida today to discover how we can assist you in your rehabilitation journey. There are many factors that need to be considered before selecting the strongest methadone rehabilitation facilities to meet your individual needs.

Inpatient Clinics vs Outpatient Clinics

Highly successful treatments for addiction to methadone consist of both outpatient and inpatient treatment options. Residential treatments are sometimes needed for more severe addictions, as the structured and cleaner environments provided for patients are stronger for recovery. Outpatient treatment options provide far more freedom and opportunities for those patients looking to socially participate, but also more opportunities for relapsing.

Is residential rehabilitation needed?

Residential rehabilitation facilities, such as the facilities offered at Detox of South Florida, assist addicts in overcoming their addictions. There is a strong distinction between addiction and abuse.

  • Abuse occurs when the individuals deliberately misuse methadone or other painkillers.
  • Addiction is the compulsion to abuse these prescription narcotics.

If you or someone you love may have a history of abuse or addiction, or have already attempted outpatient treatment without success, it is recommended to seek assistance at inpatient methadone painkiller rehab centers.

Dependence versus Tolerance

The development of a tolerance to substances, and cultivating a dependence on it are similar, but very different. Tolerance occurs naturally. The body’s responses to drugs lessen over repeated doses. This can be seen in caffeine, and in extreme cases alcohol. Dependence sets in when the human body craves the drug to properly function.

Drug dependence is not the same as addiction. While dependence is a physical need, addiction is psychological and physical.

Are methadone rehabilitation centers private?

All methadone rehab centers are required to keep medical history, records, treatment details, and personal data confidential, revealing only information to those approved by the patient before the start of treatment. Patients can add or remove people from the list with written approval. Sometimes, patients have a private room yet undergo observation, ensuring that no harmful effects occur from methadone withdrawal. Patients may also be assigned a roommate, depending on the facility.

How long do these inpatient methadone rehab programs last?

Full recovery from a methadone addiction cannot exist on a set timeline. It depends on co-occurring mental disorders and other factors that vary with the person. Methadone rehab programs at Detox of South Florida offer treatments lasting 30, 60 or 90 days. The more severe the addiction or extensive the abuse history, the longer the patient should consider.

Thirty-day treatment programs typically focus on detox alone. Sixty- and 90-day programs offer extensive psychotherapy treatment plans. For those who have unstable living situations, longer durations may be available to help the person rejoin society.

What Happens During Treatment

  • In intake, the patient partakes in physical checkups and preliminary assessments, and enjoys an orientation to the treatment facility.
  • In detox, the phases vary, depending on addiction severity and other withdrawal medications the patient has been taking.
  • Addiction therapy consists of CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy), assisting the patient both mentally (to fight drug cravings) and group-wise (moral support and encouragement for others on the same journey).
  • In specialized care, co-occurring mental disorders are worked on. Inpatient care to treat these mental disorders is often necessary because co-occurring conditions increase the likelihood of substance abuse.
  • For aftercare, after the patient is released, psychiatrists, other doctors and facility staff members will follow up to ensure the patient is not relapsing.

Treatment Payment Options

Staying at inpatient methadone rehabilitation centers such as Detox of South Florida can cost people thousands and thousands of dollars. After all, treatment housing and related expenses are all covered. Some insurance programs cover treatment, though. Give us a call and see how we can assist you!

Should I stay or should I go now?

Choosing the right methadone rehab facility also depends on location. Your finances may not allow a lot of travel. Staying near home gives you access to a support network of family and friends, which can be a vital tool for recovery from any addiction.

What happens after I enter rehab?

You or your loved one should expect to have regular sessions and meetings scheduled after release from a methadone rehab center. Relapsing into addiction is a real risk, but support groups and counseling alleviate this risk due to the accountability they bring.

Are you or your loved one ready to take the next step?

Addiction is a physical and psychological disorder, but entering a methadone treatment center is a conscious decision. If you recognize that methadone abuse is causing a problem that you cannot stop on your own and you are ready to make the full commitment to recovery, you are ready for treatment.

Are you ready? Give Detox of South Florida a call or email today and get on the road to recovery.

Benzodiazepine Maintenance and Treatment Options

Benzodiazepine are highly habit-forming prescription medications, utilized for numerous treatments of conditions relating to stress. Examples include anxiety issues, sleep problems such as insomnia, disorders that cause seizures (like epilepsy) and alcohol withdrawal (which can in turn lead to anxiety and seizures).

Often referred to as “benzos”, benzodiazepine based drugs tend to lead to dependence, and eventually addiction. This is particularly true if they are used and abused for extended periods of time.

While this withdrawal may appear to be daunting, there are many different ways to make benzodiazepine withdrawal more tolerable. The most effective way to guarantee comfort through the course of detox is to take part in a medically-procedural withdrawal at a licensed facility such as Detox of South Florida.

Benzodiazepine medications are habit-forming, and can cause uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms when users suddenly stop using and abusing the drug. Specifically, they affect the gamma aminobutyric acid, or GABA, receptors.

These receptors are not meant to react to artificial GABA stimulants such as benzos, which means that your mind may “believe” that it needs to create its own natural gamma aminobutyric acid. However, when you stop taking benzos, your body is suddenly with this essential acid. Therefore, you crave benzos. This is how you build a physical and psychological dependence to benzodiazepines.

There are several different formulations of benzodiazepines, and consequently, a variety of brand names of this drug. Since benzodiazepines affect body and mind equally, the drugs’ withdrawal symptoms do as well.

Some people may have suicidal thoughts. If you experience thoughts of suicide or self-harm, seek help immediately. Benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms extend past the mind and impact the body. Here are some common physical symptoms associated with benzo withdrawal:

  • Sleep difficulties
  • Restlessness
  • Impaired vision
  • Sensitivity to sound or light
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Difficulty with speech
  • Diarrhea
  • Tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
  • Hair loss
  • Tremors
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Headaches
  • Full body aches
  • Sweating
  • Dizziness
  • Seizures
  • Intense abdominal pains
  • High blood pressure
  • Intestinal and digestive problems
  • Numbness or tingling in extremities
  • Heart palpitations
  • Tremors
  • Muscle pain
  • Vertigo or other balance problems

Like other drugs of abuse, benzos go by nicknames when sold on the black market. If someone you love mentions any street names for benzos and says that they are weaning off of that substance, this is a sign they may be undergoing benzo detox. Some of the drugs’ most popular street names include the following: Barbs, Downers, Georgia home boy, GHB, Grievous bodily injury, Liquid X, Nerve pills, Phennies, R2, Reds, Roofies or Rophies, Tranks, and Yellows.

Though it’s rare to die during benzodiazepine withdrawal, people have died while detoxing from benzos along with alcohol or opioids. Alcohol withdrawal particularly is closely tied to benzo withdrawal, because up to 40 percent of alcohol addicts also misuse benzos. In these multiple drug abuse cases, symptoms may include the following medical problems. Though these aren’t necessarily fatal withdrawal symptoms, they indicate that a serious degree of withdrawal that could result in death.

  • Delirium Tremens: Delirium Tremens is a medical emergency that occurs suddenly and involves full body tremors and a delirious state of mind. The condition is due to drastic changes within the nervous system when a individual’s detox includes alcohol withdrawal. It may also happen during benzo withdrawal. The condition may begin within 24 hours of chemical detox but can take up to a week to happen.
  • Grand Mal Seizures: Severe types of seizures may occur in 5% of individuals who experience alcohol detox with no professional medical aid. If a man or woman is detoxing from benzos too, the possibility of complications is much greater. Just about all alcohol withdrawal-related seizures occur less than two days following the individual’s final drink.

It is ideal to perform a benzodiazepine detox under medical supervision, where dependence professionals have established security protocols. The staff and doctors at Detox of South Florida is highly experienced, and always implements best practices among our protocols. As a licensed detox and treatment center, we are also dedicated to following all legal procedures to ensure our patients are comfortable and cared for.

Doctors may use specific drugs to help manage drug cravings and withdrawal symptoms during a medical detox. Although there are no specific medications designed especially for treating benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms, there are numerous drugs that help relieve the distress and/or pain of some indicators and help in recovery.

Fighting Opioid Battle on Two Fronts

The Boston Globe recently published an article breaking down the dynamic and complex nature fueling the nation’s increase in opioid and opiate outbreaks. The article explains how the blanket term, opioid is a euphemism obscuring the true plight at hand. The reality is Americans are being attacked on two fronts one from the deadly drug heroin and the other from its infinitely various derivatives like Oxycontin, Percocet, Vicodin among a dizzying array of others. These two subsets of the drug market kill in different way and affect different demographics in certain regions of the country.

In 1999-2019 the first wave of opioid epidemics came and skyrocketed the amount of addicts and overdose deaths to astronomical heights. The basic takeaway and consensus regarding this time was that these cases were characterized by the incoming wave of new pharmaceuticals designed to treat the overwhelming demand for pain medication that was actually effective. The impact was immediate and the country would be hooked and a subsequent crackdown by law enforcement took place in order to quell the mania. The next period from 2010-2014 would also see an increase in opioid deaths but now from not only prescription drugs but also heroin. As the country became more vigilant and required more transparency between patient doctor prescription history records people sought their drugs in the streets and in the form of heroin. To make matters worse much of this heroin was cut with synthetic highly potent analogs of heroin like fentanyl.

Fentanyl overdoses have become a major concern all their own. This period was epitomized by a reintroduction of heroin from the streets along with the same problems brought by prescription big pharmaceutical drugs. The distinct bifurcation of this epidemic has also left a unique imprint on age and gender groups within the United States. Most prescription overdoses have affected a slightly older demographic between the ages of 45-64. Heroin has been the prefered drug by the younger 25-34 cohort with an especial affinity towards men as opposed to women. Women were more likely to overdose or become addicted to prescription medication rather than heroin. Kevin Gabbert from the Iowa Department of Health went on to say the following with regards to heroin: “It may not be as significant as what you’re seeing in the eastern part of the country, but the rate of increase has been substantial, in the course of five days in early April, there were five overdose deaths in the eastern part of the state, and heroin is among the drugs suspected to be involved.”

So far the geographic implications have been concentrated mostly in the eastern part of the country especially in New England, but were bound to see that change. It already appears that its influence has proliferated in neighboring parts of the country and beyond. The CDC went on to say that the death toll is probably much worse than the figures illustrate. The way certain states and regions observe and tabulate their data is sometimes skewed and belies the true extent of the damage, giving a false sense of security. The one thing that is for certain is that the problem seems to be getting much worse.

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